Early Specialization vs. Multiple Sports

Early Specialization Vs. Playing Multiple Sports

Baseball Brains contributes writing to many websites and blogs across the internet, and we like to bring it to the attention of our readers when we do.

Recently we wrote an article for Cleat Geeks on whether young athletes should specialize in one sport or play multiple sports when they're growing up.

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Our article featured Alabama Head Softball Coach Patrick Murphy as well as Georgia Pitching Coach Fred Corral, and we would like to thank both of them very much for speaking with Baseball Brains for the article.

The article can be found here, and it's very well worth a read if you have a minute.

The debate about early specialization versus multiple sports participation is a common one, and it's becoming more and more prevalent with the increasing number of clubs and travel teams around the country.  What draws many kids and families to the 'club scene' is the promise of good coaching, exposure to high level coaches and recruiters, and better competition.

It's true that specializing in one area and joining teams which allow for much of the above can benefit a young athlete in the short term.  It's more than just tempting, it is truly beneficial in some of those ways and others.  The true question then becomes, how does early specialization for an athlete effect them long term?  How does it effect their skills, their sports involvement, their social life, their life skills, and many other aspects that must be examined when we explore these issues.

That is was we took a look at in the article, how does early specialization effect long term development and skill acquisition of a young athlete?

We have some great articles on this blog about becoming a well rounded athlete as well.

 

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